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The event calendar shows upcoming club events. Select a view then use the navigation buttons to move between dates. Click on the event to view more information, including the event description, times, location, fees and any rules regarding attendance; you can also register for events from this screen. Click on the magnifying glass on the toolbar to see search and filter options.


June, 2021

Tuesday
15
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Lawndale Christian Legal Center presents a Restorative Justice conversation with Cliff Nellis, LCLC's Executive Director and Amy Campanelli, Vice President of Restorative Justice and former Cook County Public Defender. Cliff and Amy will talk about the issues in our criminal justice system in Cook County and beyond and Amy will share what she learned in her time as public defender about how real transformation could happen. Please submit questions in advance to Karen at kkopf@lclc.net, which will be answered during the last 15 minutes of the event.
Tuesday
15
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The Hunt Institute presents "Race & Education | Indigenous Education: Past, Present and Future" While education can be a vehicle for uplift, opportunity, and social mobility, it can also be leveraged as a mechanism for exclusion and as a tool of forced assimilation. The destructive legacy of figures like Richard Pratt and boarding schools for indigenous children still loom large, with the implications for indigenous children and families still being felt today. In this webinar hear from resource experts on the intersections of American indigenous education and hopes for liberation. Featuring: · Angelique Albert Executive Director, American Indian Graduate Center · Dr. Amanda R. Tachine Assistant Professor, Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College · Diana Cournoyer Executive Director, National Indian Education Association · Sarah EchoHawk CEO, American Indian Science and Engineering Society
Tuesday
15
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After a decade of work to dismantle the school-to-prison pipeline, the movement to transform school safety in Chicago is at a critical moment. As we continue to work with partners and the Whole School Safety committees across 55 high schools that remain with SROs, VOYCE invite you to join them for a powerful learning session on how one Chicago public high school transformed school safety without SROs.

There is a critical opportunity to reinvest resources away from law enforcement approaches in our schools and into healing-centered approaches. This is a historic opportunity for parents, students, local school council members, and community members to be involved.

Join VOYCE to learn about the “The Curie Way,” a model for school safety transformation through a holistic approach grounded in holistic student support coupled with a focus on a behavioral health team strategy. Leave with actionable tools on how schools can implement similar approaches.

Moderated by Laura Washington, Chicago Sun-Times Columnist

Speakers will include:
Dr. Allison Tingwall, Executive Director of Principal Quality at Chicago Public Schools, and former Principal at Curie Metropolitan High School

Dr. Chris Graves, current Principal at LaSalle Elementary Language Academy, and former Assistant Principal at Curie Metropolitan High School

Renitra Hunter, current Curie High School student

Marques Watts, VOYCE youth leader

Jadine Chou, Chief Safety and Security Officer at Chicago Public Schools
Friday
18
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On April 22, 2021, the United States Supreme Court ruled in Jones v. Mississippi that a state’s discretionary sentencing system is both constitutionally necessary and constitutionally sufficient to sentence a juvenile to life without the possibility of parole. Although the Court affirmed its decisions in Miller and Montgomery, the dissent accused the majority of abandoning its precedent and eroding Miller’s youth-specific constitutional protections. This training, presented by the JDRC and Northwestern's CFJC, will provide participants with information on the scope and impact of Jones on the national and Illinois landscape. Participants will hear about Jones’s impact nationally from the national Campaign for the Fair Sentencing of Youth and will also learn about the Illinois landscape following Jones and the Illinois Supreme Court’s decision in People v. Lusby. The training will feature updates on relevant legislative reforms and will include an open discussion with other Illinois litigators to discuss practical strategies and tips to litigate cases moving forward.

This training is part of the IPDA Summer Seminar. The event is free. Register by June 7. Other sessions will be occurring virtually June 10, 11, 17 and 18 from 2:00 - 4:00 p.m.
Tuesday
22
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The question of whether police belong in schools has been a long-debated topic in the United States. With the increased focus on policing generally, the debate has grown more intense. Proponents argue that police can more effectively address student-to-student conflict, such as bullying, and increase overall safety in an age of recurring school shootings. Those who oppose argue that police in schools contribute to the school-to-prison pipeline and result in disparities based on race and/or disability in discipline and arrests, as well as a climate of fear for students of color. Speakers on this program will present the data, discuss the impact of police in schools and examine this issue critically to confront the question of whether police in schools result in enhanced student safety.



Speakers:
- Miriam A. Rollin – Attorney and Director, Education Civil Rights Alliance, National Center for Youth Law
- Ky’Eisha W. Penn – Staff Attorney, Advancement Project
- Randi Weingarten – President, American Federation of Teachers
- Maryam Salmanova – Paralegal, IntegrateNYC Peer Defense Program
- Ashley C. Sawyer (Moderator) – Senior Director of Campaigns, Girls for Gender Equity
Thursday
24
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Incorporating the realities of race and the impact of racial injustice at every stage of a client’s case is a critical component in providing holistic, effective, client-centered legal advocacy to Black and brown youth. Defenders and advocates contribute to systemic reform when they challenge racial injustice in their legal advocacy on behalf of individual clients. Fourth Amendment jurisprudence is ripe for these types of arguments. This session will encourage participants to shift the reasonable-person standard that underpins current Fourth Amendment jurisprudence to one that focuses on the actions of the “reasonable Black child.” Incorporating knowledge of implicit racial bias, adolescent development, and the relationship between Black and brown youth and the police, this session will help participants identify strategies to raise issues of race and adolescence in Fourth Amendment practice. Trainers will urge participants to consider the commonsense judgments and inferences that flow readily from the unique interplay between race and adolescence in a police-youth encounter. Participants will discuss: How race and adolescence affect every critical question in the Fourth Amendment analysis; The extent to which a child’s race affects the court’s objective inquiry about whether a police-youth encounter ventures from a “contact” into a seizure; The extent that a child’s race affects the voluntariness of consent; The extent that a child’s race affects the officers’ interpretation of a child’s behavior; and The importance of raising our client’s narrative and experience in courtroom advocacy to empower our clients and effect change in Fourth Amendment jurisprudence. This training is available to all juvenile defense professionals, including juvenile defenders, policy advocates, investigators, social workers, mitigation specialists, paralegals, clerks, legal secretaries, and other staff members in support of this work.
Friday
25
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Tori Franklin (USA Track & Field) and Zach Banner (Offensive Tackle, Pittsburgh Steelers), will be hosting a virtual discussion for players, coaches, leagues, owners, teams and strategic partners to connect with and learn from experts and organizations directly serving justice impacted youth to lift up the critical importance of young people’s rights, while also highlighting Players Coalition’s youth justice framework and speaking to the challenges and needs of youth. NJDC Deputy Director Ebony Howard and other youth advocates will discuss the critical importance of youth rights.
Wednesday
30
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Over the last several years, sweeping policy changes have been made to the Illinois criminal legal system with respect to bond reform, addressing violence by investment in disinvested communities (Restore, Reinvest and Renew [R3]), and police accountability. The implementation of these policy changes are now underway.


Often in the policymaking process, a great deal of time and effort is directed to the development and codification of policy, however, without rigorous attention to the policy's interpretation and implementation, the principles incorporated in the policy and its mandated outcomes can be lost or distorted.



This year, the Collaborative will focus on implementation of these three areas of change to assess the consistency between the original intent of recent policy changes and intent incorporated in the implementation. The Collaborative will examine the existing mechanisms for implementation, their operations, and how they impact people affected by policy changes. Subject matter experts, people impacted by the policy implementation, those responsible for implementing the policies, and advocates will engage in discussion about the implementation process, possible course corrections, potential obstacles, and effective monitoring and evaluation.


Since 2008, members of the Collaborative have worked to make our state and local criminal justice systems better serve the needs of those involved in the justice system and the communities in which they reside. Through research, public education and committee work, the members of the Collaborative have played a role in producing recommendations for stakeholders at the city, county and state levels to incorporate best practice policies and programs into their criminal justice and public safety initiatives.
Wednesday
30
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Approximately 13 million misdemeanor charges are filed each year in the United States, representing around 80% of all cases. Today, law enforcement’s unchecked discretion allows them to use the extensive collection of misdemeanor offenses as a pretext to stop, search, and arrest individuals—disproportionately Black and Latinx individuals— for behaviors that have little or nothing to do with public safety. In serving as the justification for these stops, misdemeanors often function as a gateway to police violence, as in the cases of Eric Garner, Philando Castile, Daunte Wright, and George Floyd, each of whom was stopped for a suspected misdemeanor.

Lisa Wayne, Past President of NACDL and the current President of the NACDL Foundation for Criminal Justice, will moderate a discussion around Brave New Films’ recently released documentary Racially Charged: America’s Misdemeanor Problem. This short film traces America’s modern misdemeanor system back to the post-civil war period, unpacking the criminalization of certain conduct as a means for social and economic control over Black Americans. Panelists will include Alexandra Natapoff, the Lee S. Kreindler Professor of Law at Harvard Law School and author of Punishment Without Crime: How Our Massive Misdemeanor System Traps the Innocent and Makes America More Unequal; and Calvin Booth, Chair of the Drug Policy Working Group at The People’s Commission to Decriminalize Maryland.

This event is presented by NACDL.

Please note: They will not be screening the film during the event on June 30th and are encouraging all attendees to watch it prior to the discussion. The film is available here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bm2PxE0HMr4